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art-of-swords:

How To Saber a Champagne Bottle

For the LOLs: A daring way to open a Champagne Bottle. Please do not try this at home. 

Read the full instructions here.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Alton Brown

dropkickpikachu:

remember when people thought phones were going to do this and instead now they’re getting bigger and bigger cuz we want to watch movies and shit on them

dropkickpikachu:

remember when people thought phones were going to do this and instead now they’re getting bigger and bigger cuz we want to watch movies and shit on them

dallonsmiles:

ryansgayliner:

the thrilling saga in which Panic! owns the fuck out of WBC

A+ handling of the situation

bethama:

"Today is a good day to dye!" So says Lieutenant Worf, son of Mogh!

(At least, that’s what knitted Worf would say. Trust me, I asked him.)

(Pst! I also made a Data!)

(Pst! I’ve also made a bunch of comic book characters!)

foxghost:

*squints at suspiciously*I don’t think this was made for fingers

foxghost:

*squints at suspiciously*
I don’t think this was made for fingers

lord-of-the-rings-is-my-drug:

a secret only fire can tell

art-of-swords:

Mameluke Presentation Sabre

  • Dated: circa 1820
  • Culture: British
  • Measurements: overall length 36”

Forged of Damascus steel, this Mameluke presentation sabre was proudly carried by officers of the British Army during the early 19th century. The curved blade is richly decorated with intricate Turkish and oriental motifs, including a fire-gilded lion’s head on the hilt, while its gilt and embossed shagreen scabbard features two rings in order to hang from a belt.

Mameluke swords take their name from Mamluk warriors of Ottoman Egypt. Today, modern Mameluke swords are worn by U.S. Marine officers, commemorating the Marines’ service during the First Barbary War, 1801-1805. To find such an extraordinary weapon in such excellent condition is truly rare. 

Source: Copyright © 2014 M.S. Rau Antiques